1. National Palace Museum:

The National Palace Museum is located in Shilin, Taipei, Taiwan. It has a permanent collection of nearly 700,000 pieces of ancient Chinese imperial artifacts and artworks, making it one of the largest of its type in the world. The collection encompasses over 10,000 years of Chinese history from the Neolithic age to the late Qing Dynasty. Most of the collections are high quality pieces collected by China's ancient emperors.

The National Palace Museum and the Palace Museum in the Forbidden City in Beijing, mainland China, share the same roots. The old Palace Museum in Beijing split in two as a result of the Chinese Civil War, which divided China into the two entities of the Republic of China (ROC) on the island of Taiwan and the People's Republic of China (PRC) on the mainland respectively.

2. Taroko National Park:

Taroko National Park is one of the nine national parks in Taiwan and was named after the Taroko Gorge, the landmark gorge of the park. The park spans Taichung Municipality, Nantou County, and Hualien County.

The park was originally established as the Tsugitaka-Taroko National Park by the Governor-General of Taiwan on 12 December 1937 when Taiwan was part of the Empire of Japan. After the Empire of Japan's defeat in World War II, the Republic of China assumed control of Taiwan. The ROC government subsequently abolished the park on 15 August 1945. It was not until 28 November 1986 that the park was reestablished.

3. Taipei 101:

Taipei 101 – stylized as Taipei 101[1] and formerly known as the Taipei World Financial Center – is a landmark supertall skyscraper in Xinyi District, Taipei, Taiwan. The building was officially classified as the world's tallest in 2004, and remained such until the completion of Burj Khalifa in Dubai in 2009. In 2011, the building was awarded the LEED platinum certification, the highest award according to the Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) rating system, and became the tallest and largest green building in the world.

Construction on the 101-story tower started in 1999 and finished in 2004. The tower has served as an icon of modern Taiwan ever since its opening. The building was architecturally created as a symbol of the evolution of technology and Asian tradition. Its postmodernist approach to style incorporates traditional design elements and gives them modern treatments. The tower is designed to withstand typhoons and earthquakes. A multi-level shopping mall adjoining the tower houses hundreds of stores, restaurants and clubs. Fireworks launched from Taipei 101 features prominently in international New Year's Eve broadcasts and the structure appears frequently in travel literature and international media.

4. Chiang Kai-shek Memorial Hall:

The National Chiang Kai-shek Memorial Hall is a Taiwanese national monument, landmark and tourist attraction erected in memory of Chiang Kai-shek, former President of the Republic of China. It is located in Zhongzheng District, Taipei, Taiwan.

The monument, surrounded by a park, stands at the east end of Memorial Hall Square. The structure is framed on the north and south by the National Theater and National Concert Hall.

Construction on the 101-story tower started in 1999 and finished in 2004. The tower has served as an icon of modern Taiwan ever since its opening. The building was architecturally created as a symbol of the evolution of technology and Asian tradition. Its postmodernist approach to style incorporates traditional design elements and gives them modern treatments. The tower is designed to withstand typhoons and earthquakes. A multi-level shopping mall adjoining the tower houses hundreds of stores, restaurants and clubs. Fireworks launched from Taipei 101 features prominently in international New Year's Eve broadcasts and the structure appears frequently in travel literature and international media.

4. Chiang Kai-shek Memorial Hall:

The National Chiang Kai-shek Memorial Hall is a Taiwanese national monument, landmark and tourist attraction erected in memory of Chiang Kai-shek, former President of the Republic of China. It is located in Zhongzheng District, Taipei, Taiwan.

The monument, surrounded by a park, stands at the east end of Memorial Hall Square. The structure is framed on the north and south by the National Theater and National Concert Hall.

The temple has been destroyed either in full or in part in numerous earthquakes and fires but Taipei residents have consistently rebuilt and renovated it. Most recently, it was hit by American bombers during the Raid on Taipei on May 31, 1945, during World War II because the Japanese were reportedly hiding armaments there. The main building and the left corridor were damaged and many precious artifacts and artworks were lost. It was rebuilt after the end of World War II a few months later.

Longshan Temple is seen as an emblematic example of Taiwanese classical architecture, with Southern Chinese influences commonly seen in older buildings.

6. Kenting National Park:

The Kenting National Park, commonly known as Kenting, is a national park located in the Hengchun Peninsula of Pingtung County, Taiwan, covering Hengchun, Checheng, and Manzhou Townships. Established on January 1, 1984, it is Taiwan's oldest and southernmost national park, covering the southernmost area of the Taiwan Island along Bashi Channel.

The park covers about 181 square kilometers (70 sq. mi) of land, 152 square kilometers (59 sq. mi) of sea, weighing in at 333 square kilometers (129 sq. mi) combined. Nan Wan and Banana Bay is surrounded by the Pacific Ocean, the Taiwan Strait, and the Luzon Strait. The park is 90 kilometers (56 mi) away from Kaohsiung, 140 kilometers (87 mi) away from Tainan.

Frequent buses link this park with Kaohsiung International Airport, Taiwan Railway Administration's Kaohsiung Station and Taiwan High Speed Rail's Zuoying Station. One-way ride takes around 2 hours and 30 minutes. This park is served by the domestic Hengchun Airport although flights are rare and are subject to cancellation due to the strong Katabatic wind which is frequent in the Hengchun Peninsula.

7. Buddha Memorial Center:

The Fo Guang Shan Buddha Memorial Center is a Mahayana Buddhist cultural, religious and educational complex located in Taiwan's Kaohsiung City, Dashu District. The center is affiliated with Fo Guang Shan, one of Taiwan's largest Buddhist organizations. The center purportedly houses one of the tooth relics of Gautama Buddha, the founder of the Buddhist faith.

Building plans for the Buddha Memorial Center started immediately in 1998 with support from the government. The site is situated immediately behind the main temple and covers more than 100 hectares. The complex faces east and is built along a central axial line. There is the Welcoming Hall, the eight Chinese-styled pagodas that stand for the Noble Eightfold Path, Photo Terrace, Bodhi Square, Memorial Hall, four stupas that symbolize the Four Noble Truths, and the Fo Guang Buddha.

0 Comments1

Sorry, No more post.

Your Comment

Login To Comment

discard

By posting your Comment, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.