1. Sentosa:

Sentosa is a popular island resort in Singapore, visited by some twenty million people a year. Attractions include a 2 km (1.2 mi) long sheltered beach, Fort Siloso, two golf courses, the Merlion, 14 hotels, and the Resorts World Sentosa, featuring the theme park Universal Studios Singapore.

The island has an area of close to 5 km2 (1.9 sq mi). It lies just half a kilometre (a quarter of a mile) away from the southern coast of the main island of Singapore. It is Singapore's fourth largest island (excluding the main island). 70% of the island is covered by secondary rainforest, the habitat of monitor lizards, monkeys, peacocks, parrots as well as other native fauna and flora, also, when the construction of Resorts World Sentosa commenced, environmental impact was kept at a minimum when over two hundred trees in the designated area were replanted elsewhere on the island. The island also has 3.2 km (2.0 mi) stretch of white sand beach. Significantly large portions of land are currently being added to Sentosa due to land reclamation.

Sentosa can be reached from the Singapore mainland via a short causeway or Cable Car, which originates from Mount Faber and passes through HarbourFront en route to its final destination at Imbiah Lookout.

The island is also accessible by the Sentosa Express monorail, which replaced the old Sentosa Monorail that operated from 1982 to 2005. The Sentosa Express has three stations on Sentosa and one on mainland Singapore. The northern terminus of the line, which opened on 15 January 2007, is located at the VivoCity shopping mall on the mainland and the southernmost terminus, Beach Station, is located on Sentosa Island. In Vivocity, the mainland MRT is in turn served by the HarbourFront of the North East Line and the Circle Line.

2. Singapore Flyer:

The Singapore Flyer is a giant Ferris wheel in Singapore. Described by its operators as an observation wheel, it opened in 2008, construction having taken about 2½ years. It carried its first paying passengers on 11 February, opened to the public on 1 March, and was officially opened on 15 April. It has 28 air-conditioned capsules, each able to accommodate 28 passengers, and incorporates a three-story terminal building. [Not in citation given]

The Flyer has an overall height of 165 meters (541 ft) and was the world's tallest Ferris wheel until the 167.6 m (550 ft) High Roller, which is 2.6 m (9 ft) taller than the Flyer, opened on the Las Vegas Strip in Nevada, US, on 31 March 2014. The previous record holder, the Star of Nanchang, in Jiangxi, China, is 160 m (525 ft) tall, although its 153 m (502 ft) diameter wheel is larger than the Flyer's 150 m (492 ft) wheel.

3. Universal Studios Singapore:

Universal Studios Singapore is a theme park located within Resorts World Sentosa on Sentosa Island, Singapore. It was a key component of Genting's bid for the right to build Singapore's second integrated resort. On 8 December 2006, the Singapore government announced that the consortium had won the bid. Construction of the theme park and the rest of the resort started on 19 April 2007. It is the second Universal Studios theme park to open in Asia (Japan being the first), and the first in Southeast Asia. The official plans for the park were unveiled to the public when Universal Studios Singapore released a park map to the public on 20 October 2009. Universal Studios Singapore has since attracted more than 2 million visitors in the 9 months from its opening. Universal Parks & Resorts markets the park as a "one-of-its-kind theme park in Asia" and promises that the park will be the only one of its kind in Southeast Asia for the next 30 years.

Universal Studios Singapore is 20 hectares (49 acres) in size, occupying the easternmost part of the 49-hectare (120-acre) Resorts World Sentosa. There are a total of 24 attractions, of which 18 are original or specially adapted for the park. The park consists of seven themed zones which surround a lagoon. Each zone is based on a blockbuster movie or a television show, featuring their own unique attractions, character appearances, dining and shopping areas. The park features the world's tallest pair of dueling roller coasters that are based on the popular television series, Battlestar Galactica; a castle from the world of Shrek and Monster Rock, a live musical show featuring the Universal Monsters. Universal Studios Singapore has over 30 restaurants and food carts, together with 20 unique retail stores and carts located around the park. Attractions premiering are marked "Premiere" and dining outlets that are certified Halal are marked with "Halal".

4. Night Safari, Singapore:

The Night Safari is the world's first nocturnal zoo and is one of the most popular tourist attractions in Singapore.

The concept of a nocturnal park in Singapore was suggested in the 1980s by the former executive chairman of the Singapore Zoo, Dr Ong Swee Law. Constructed at a cost of S$63 million, the Night Safari was officially opened on 26 May 1994 and occupies 35 hectares (86 acres) of secondary rainforest adjacent to the Singapore Zoo and Upper Seletar Reservoir.

The Night Safari currently houses over 2,500 animals representing over 130 species, of which 38% are threatened species. The Night Safari is managed by Wildlife Reserves Singapore, and about 1.1 million visitors visit the safari per year. The Night Safari received its 11 millionth visitor on 29 May 2007.

5. Singapore Botanic Gardens:

The Singapore Botanic Gardens is a 156-year-old tropical garden located at the fringe of the Singapore's main shopping belt. It is one of three gardens, and the only tropical garden, to be honored as a UNESCO World Heritage Site. The Botanic Gardens has been ranked Asia's top park attraction since 2013, by TripAdvisor Travelers’ Choice Awards. It was declared the inaugural Garden of the Year, International Garden Tourism Awards in 2012, and received Michelin’s three-star rating in 2008.

Singapore Botanical Gardens is open from 5 a.m. to 12 midnight every day of the year. There is no admission fee, except for the National Orchid Garden within the main gardens.

The garden is bordered by Holland Road and Napier Road to the south, Cluny Road to the east, Tyersall Avenue and Cluny Park Road to the west and Bukit Timah Road to the North. The linear distance between the northern and southern ends is around 2.5 km (1.6 mi). There are a number of entrances in different zones of the gardens, but the Tanglin Gate facing Holland Road in the south is the grand entrance.

6. Underwater World, Singapore:

Underwater World, also known as Underwater World Singapore Pte Ltd, is an oceanarium located on the offshore Singaporean island of Sentosa. Opened in 1991, it has more than 2,500 marine animals of 250 species from different regions of the world. The oceanarium is mostly underground and it is owned by the Haw Par Corporation. The Underwater World's ticket includes admission to the Dolphin Lagoon at Palawan Beach.

Underwater World is also involved in several environmental and educational projects, such as the Living in the Ocean Programme, Ocean Ambassador Programme and the Coral Club.

The Underwater World also provides exclusive venues to host events, such as ocean-themed functions.

Underwater World has a 83-metre (272 ft) long travelator that moves visitors along a submerged 6-millimetre (0.24 in) thick acrylic-windowed tunnel from which they can look at an array of marine life including coral reefs, stingrays, moray eels, turtles, sharks and others.

7. Sri Mariamman Temple:

The Sri Mariamman Temple is Singapore's oldest Hindu temple. It is an agamic temple, built in the Dravidian style. Located at 244 South Bridge Road, in the downtown Chinatown district, the temple serves the majority Hindu Singaporeans, Tamilians, in the city-state. Due to its architectural and historical significance, the temple has been gazetted a National Monument and is a major tourist attraction. Sri Mariamman Temple is managed by the Hindu Endowments Board, a statutory board under the Ministry of Community Development, Youth and Sports.

The Sri Mariamman Temple was founded in 1827 by Naraina Pillai, eight years after the East India Company established a trading settlement in Singapore. Pillai was a government clerk from Penang who arrived in Singapore with Sir Stamford Raffles on his second visit to the island in May 1819. Pillai went on to set up the island's first construction company, and also entered the textile trade. He rapidly established himself in business and was identified as a leader of the Indian community.

Once every 12 years, in keeping with Hindu tradition, the temple is reconsecrated. An annual timiti or fire walking ceremony is held about a week before Deepavali, the Festival of Lights.

8. Jurong Bird Park:

Jurong Bird Park is a tourist attraction in Boon Lay, Singapore. The bird park, managed by Wildlife Reserves Singapore, covers an area of 0.2 square kilometers (49 acres) at the western foot of Jurong Hill, the highest point in the Jurong region.

Jurong Bird Park can be accessed on SBS Transit Service 194 from Boon Lay Bus Interchange, which has connections to the Mass Rapid Transit at Boon Lay MRT station.

9. Singapore Zoo:

The Singapore Zoo, formerly known as the Singapore Zoological Gardens and commonly known locally as the Mandai Zoo, occupies 28 hectares (69 acres) on the margins of Upper Seletar Reservoir within Singapore's heavily forested central catchment area. The zoo was built at a cost of S$9 million granted by the government of Singapore and opened on 27 June 1973. It is operated by Wildlife Reserves Singapore, who also manage the neighbouring Night Safari, River Safari and the Jurong BirdPark. There are about 315 species of animal in the zoo, of which some 16 percent are considered to be threatened species. The zoo attracts 1.7 million visitors each year.

There are three events venues in the zoo: Forest Lodge, Pavilion-By-the-Lake and Garden Pavilion. There are also three cocktail venues: Elephants of Asia, Tiger Trek and Treetops Trail. The Singapore Zoo also caters for birthday parties and weddings.

10. Peranakan Museum:

The Peranakan Museum is a museum in Singapore specialising in Peranakan culture. A sister museum to the Asian Civilisations Museum, it is the first of its kind in the world, that explores Peranakan cultures in Singapore and other former Straits Settlements in Malacca and Penang, and other Peranakan communities in Southeast Asia. It is housed in the Old Tao Nan School building at Armenian Street, which served as an extended wing to the artefact collection of Asian Civilisations Museum.

The different galleries are found in the following manner:

* Gallery 1 (Level 1)

* Galleries 2 – 5 (Level 2)

* Galleries 6 - 10 (Level 3)

* Special Exhibitions Galleries (Level 3)

Gallery 1 titled Origins provides an introduction to Peranakan culture and to various Peranakan communities in Singapore, Malacca, Penang and Southeast Asia. Visitors to the subsequent rooms will learn about the story of the traditional 12-day Peranakan wedding, where significant ceremonies like the lap chai (exchange of gifts) and chiu thau (coming of age) are presented. Visitors can also see the elaborate wedding chamber and a wedding procession taking place indoors on Level 2. Gallery 6 Nonya, features the arts and crafts of Nonyas like beadwork, along with a display on the Nonya kebaya, and the womenfolks' role of transmitting cultural values to Peranakan children. Gallery 7 shows Religion, on Peranakans and their faiths. Gallery 8 illustrates the commerce, politics and social affairs of prominent Peranakans in Singapore’s history in this exhibition titled Public Life. Gallery 9 on Food and Feasting, provides a grand banquet setting with the world’s best collection of nonya porcelain. And finally the visual experience concludes with an introspection of modern Peranakans and how they feel about their heritage and the future of their culture in Gallery 10 (Conversations). Additional Special Exhibitions Galleries will feature changing specific-themed exhibitions.

11. Tiger Sky Tower:

The Tiger Sky Tower, previously known as Carlsberg Sky Tower, is the highest observation tower in Singapore. It is located in the Imbiah Lookout zone in the centre of Sentosa Island.

The tower has a height of 110 metres (360 ft) above ground level, or about 36 floors tall — and an elevation of 131 metres (430 ft) above sea level. The tower was completed in 2004, and is owned by C. Melchers GmbH & Co. At ground level, visitors enter a large disc-shaped air-conditioned cabin fitted with glass windows all round. The cabin revolves slowly for views as it ascends the tower.

From the top one can view the entire length of Singapore's skyline and a panoramic view of the island. On a clear day, one may even be able to see at part of Johor Bahru and Indonesia's skyline.

12. Wild Wild Wet:

Wild Wild Wet is the largest water theme park in Singapore. It was being located at NTUC Downtown East in Pasir Ris, Singapore.

Thrilling Rides

* The Waterworks (Dueling Body Slides)

* Torpedo (Body Slide)

* Ular-Lah (Family Raft Slide)

* Slide Up (Halfpipe-Slide)

* Tsunami (Wave Pool)

Gentle Rides

* Shiok River (Lazy River)

* Jacuzzi (Jacuzzi)

Kiddie Rides

* Professor's Playground (Water Playground)

* Yippie! (Baby Play Area)

13. Lau Pa Sat:

Lau Pa Sat, also known as Telok Ayer Market, is a historic building in Singapore, and is located in Downtown Core within the Central Area. It is currently a food center. There are several shops inside the market such as a 24 hours Cheers Store, a shoe repair shop, a tailor and a laundry store. In the evenings on the weekend a live band plays at the stage in the middle of the market.

14. Armenian Church, Singapore:

The Armenian Church of Saint Gregory the Illuminator, often known as Armenian Church, is the oldest Christian church in Singapore, located at Hill Street in the Museum Planning Area, within the Central Area. Originally a parish of the Armenian Apostolic Church, an Oriental Orthodox denomination, the last Armenian parish priest left in the late 1930s, and with the dwindling Armenian population in Singapore. By the Pontifical Order of His Holiness Karekin II, Supreme Patriarch and Catholicos of All Armenians, Very Rev. Fr. Zaven Yazichyan, a member of the Brotherhood of Holy Etchmiadzin; has been appointed to serve as the spiritual pastor of Singapore, on 29th March, 2016. Armenian and Oriental Orthodox services are regularly held at the church.

The last Armenian parish priest left in the late 1930s, and with the dwindling Armenian population in Singapore, on 29th March, 2016 by the Pontifical Order of His Holiness Karekin II, Supreme Patriarch and Catholicos of All Armenians, Very Rev. Fr. Zaven Yazichyan, a member of the Brotherhood of Holy Etchmiadzin; has been appointed to serve as the spiritual pastor of Singapore.

15. Kusu Island:

Kusu Island is one of the Southern Islands in Singapore, located about 5.6 kilometres (3.5 miles) to the south of the main island of Singapore, off the Straits of Singapore. The name means "Tortoise Island" or "Turtle Island" in Chinese; the island is also known as Peak Island or Pulau Tembakul in Malay. The word kusu also means flatulence in Tamil, one of Singapore's national languages—however, this is not related in any way to the name of the island, and is a misconception. From two tiny outcrops on a reef, the island was enlarged and transformed into an island holiday resort of 85,000 square metres (914,932 sq ft).

It is popular for its lagoons, pristine beaches and tranquil settings. Visits are often made by ferry from the nearby Marina South Pier to see the wishing well and Tortoise Sanctuary. Afternoon picnics are also very popular. Overnight stay is not permitted on the island. However, most ferries to Kusu Island also take in Saint John's Island which does have overnight lodging.

16. Kong Meng San Phor Kark See Monastery:

The Kong Meng San Phor Kark See Monastery (also the Bright Hill Pujue Chan Monastery), is a Buddhist temple located in Bishan, Singapore. Built by Zhuan Dao in the early 20th century to propagate Buddhism and to provide lodging for monks, this monastery is the largest Buddhist temple in Singapore.

The monastery celebrates Vesak Day annually with a variety of ceremonies such as "Bathing the Buddha", and "Three-Steps-One-Bow". Other major events include Ching Ming. As the East Asian traditional practice of burning incense and joss materials remain despite repeated pleas and discouragement, costlier alternatives appeared which include the installation of a new four-storey, $1 million eco-friendly burner in 2014.

In 2014, the Buddhist College of Singapore operated by the monastery announced intentions of accepting female monastics, with the new nunnery campus housed at Poh Ern Shih Temple, taking in 45 students every two years. The same year in December, KMSPKS Youth led their first overseas humanitarian mission into Chiang Mai, Thailand.

When Singapore founding father Mr Lee Kuan Yew died in 2015, the monastery also conducted the primary Buddhist prayer service on 26 March 2015 in conjunction with the Singapore Buddhist Federation, 3000 turned up.

17. NTUC Downtown East:

NTUC Downtown East is an entertainment hub located in Pasir Ris, Singapore. It is 147,000 square metres in area and was officially opened on 5 November 2000. It is run by NTUC Club. It provides leisure and entertainment for families and youths. It competes with the two IRs, especially Resorts World Sentosa. It has free wi-fi from 2006 onwards.

Various types of entertainment features are being provided in NTUC Downtown East. Such features are shopping, arcades and many others. The attractions include:

* E!hub, a five-storey leisure and entertainment hub.

* Wild Wild Wet, a water park.

* Escape Theme Park, an amusement park (closed in November 2011).

* D'Resort @ Downtown East, a resort and hotel combination that was opened in 2015.

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