1. Grand Palace:

The Grand Palace is a complex of buildings at the heart of Bangkok, Thailand. The palace has been the official residence of the Kings of Siam (and later Thailand) since 1782. The king, his court and his royal government were based on the grounds of the palace until 1925. The present monarch, King Bhumibol Adulyadej (Rama IX), currently resides at Chitralada Royal Villa in the Dusit Palace, but the Grand Palace is still used for official events. Several royal ceremonies and state functions are held within the walls of the palace every year. The palace is one of the most popular tourist attractions in Thailand.

2. Wat Phra Kaew:

Wat Phra Kaew (Pronunciation, English: Temple of the Emerald Buddha; full official name Wat Phra Si Rattana Satsadaram) is regarded as the most sacred Buddhist temple (wat) in Thailand. The Emerald Buddha housed in the temple is a potent religio-political symbol and the palladium (protective image) of Thai society. It is located in Phra Nakhon District, the historic centre of Bangkok, within the precincts of the Grand Palace.

The Emerald Buddha, a dark green statue, is in a standing form, about 66 centimetres (26 in) tall, carved from a single jade stone ("emerald" in Thai means deep green colour and not the specific stone). It is carved in the meditating posture in the style of the Lanna school of the northern Thailand. Except for the Thai King and, in his stead, the Crown Prince, no other persons are allowed to touch the statue. The King changes the cloak around the statue three times a year, corresponding to the summer, winter, and rainy seasons, an important ritual performed to usher good fortune to the country during each season.

The sacred temples in Thailand follow a dress code, which is strictly followed. Men must wear long pants and sleeved shirts and shoes; women must wear long skirts. Visitors who arrive dressed otherwise may rent appropriate clothing items at the entry area of the temple. It is compulsory to remove the shoes before entering the temple, as a sign of respect of the Buddha, as is the practice in all other temples in Thailand. While offering prayers before the Buddha image, the sitting posture should avoid any offensive stretching of feet towards the deity; the feet should be tucked in towards the back.

3. Wat Arun:

Wat Arun Ratchawararam Ratchawaramahawihan or Wat Arun is a Buddhist temple (wat) in Bangkok Yai district of Bangkok, Thailand, on the Thonburi west bank of the Chao Phraya River. The temple derives its name from the Hindu god Aruna, often personified as the radiations of the rising sun. Wat Arun is among the best known of Thailand's landmarks and the first light of the morning reflects off the surface of the temple with pearly iridescence. Although the temple had existed since at least the seventeenth century, its distinctive prang (spires) were built in the early nineteenth century during the reign of King Rama II.

Wat Arun can be easily accessed through the Chao Phraya River, and ferries travel across the river towards the Maharaj pier. For the foreigners, the temple charges an entrance fee of 50 baht (as of March 2013). During Kathina, the king travels to Wat Arun in a procession of royal barges to present new robes to the monks.

4. Jim Thompson House:

The Jim Thompson House is now a museum in Bangkok. It is a complex of various old Thai structures that the American businessman Jim Thompson collected from all parts of Thailand in the 1950s and 1960s. It is one of the most popular tourist destinations in Thailand.

As Thompson was building his silk company, he also became a major collector of Southeast Asian art, which at the time was not well-known internationally. He built a large collection of Buddhist and secular art not only from Thailand but from Burma, Cambodia, and Laos, frequently travelling to those countries on buying trips.

The house, at 6 Soi Kasemsan 2, Rama 1 Road, Pathumwan, is run by The James H. W. Thompson Foundation under the royal patronage of H.R.H. Princess Maha Chakri Sirindhorn. Guided tours are available daily.

5. Khaosan Road:

Khaosan Road or Khao San Road is a short street in central Bangkok, Thailand. It is in the Banglamphu area of (Phra Nakhon district) about 1 kilometre (0.62 mi) north of the Grand Palace and Wat Phra Kaew.

"Khaosan" translates as "milled rice", a reminder that in former times the street was a major Bangkok rice market. In the last 20 years, however, Khaosan Road has developed into a world famous "backpacker ghetto". It offers cheap accommodation, ranging from "mattress in a box" style hotels to reasonably priced 3-star hotels. In an essay on the backpacker culture of Khaosan Road, Susan Orlean called it "the place to disappear". It is also a base of travel: coaches leave daily for all major tourist destinations in Thailand, from Chiang Mai in the north to Ko Pha Ngan in the south, and there are many relatively inexpensive travel agents who can arrange visas and transportation to the neighboring countries of Cambodia, Laos, Malaysia, and Vietnam.

Khaosan shops sell handcrafts, paintings, clothes, local fruits, unlicensed CDs, DVDs, a wide range of fake IDs, used books, plus many useful backpacker items.

During late evening, the streets turn into bars and music is played, food hawkers sell barbecued insects, exotic snacks for tourists, and there are also locals flogging ping pong shows.

There are several pubs and bars where backpackers meet to discuss their travels. The area is internationally known as a center of dancing, partying, and just prior to the traditional Thai New Year (Songkran festival) of 13–15 April, water splashing that usually turns into a huge water fight. One Thai writer has described Khaosan as "...a short road that has the longest dream in the world".

A Buddhist temple under royal patronage, the centuries-old Wat Chana Songkram, is directly opposite Khaosan Road to the west, while the area to the northwest contains an Islamic community and several small mosques.

6. Lumphini Park:

Lumphini Park is a 360 rai (57.6-hectare (142-acre)) park in Bangkok, Thailand. The park offers rare open public space, trees, and playgrounds in the Thai capital and contains an artificial lake where visitors can rent boats. Paths around the park totalling approximately 2.5 km in length are a popular area for evening joggers. Officially, cycling is only permitted during the day between the times of 10:00 to 15:00. There is a smoking ban throughout the park. Dogs are not allowed.

The park has Bangkok's first public library and dance hall. During winter, the Palm Garden of Lumphini Park becomes the site for the annual Concert in the Park featuring classical music by the Bangkok Symphony Orchestra and other bands.

Transportation are available to reach this park, BTS Skytrain Silom Line, Sala Daeng Station is nearby. MRT (Bangkok), Lumphini Station and Si Lom Stations are nearby.

7. Golden Buddha (statue):

The Golden Buddha, officially titled Phra Phuttha Maha Suwan Patimakon is a gold statue, with a weight of 5.5 tons (5,500 kilograms). It is located in the temple of Wat Traimit, Bangkok, Thailand.

The statue is 3 meters (9.8 ft) tall and weighs 5.5 tons (5.4 long tons; 6.1 short tons). (According to another account, the statue measures 3.91 meters from base to top, and 3.10 meters across the lap from knee to knee.) It can be disassembled into nine pieces. The statue was housed in a wat in Ayutthaya until the mid-19th century, and its provenance from Ayutthaya excludes the possibility of it having been made after about 1750.

8. Siam Paragon:

Siam Paragon is a shopping mall in Bangkok, Thailand. It is one of the biggest shopping centres in Asia.[citation needed] Opened on December 9, 2005, it includes a wide range of specialty stores and restaurants as well as a multiplex movie theatre (consisted of 15 large size theaters with one of them having the biggest screen and seating capacity in Asia)[citation needed] and the Sea Life Ocean World (Underwater world) aquarium (the largest aquarium in South East Asia) and an exhibition hall and the Thai Art Gallery and also an opera concert hall. It also has a large bowling alley and karaoke centre.

Siam Paragon has become since its opening the place to be for Thailand's upper class, tourists, and locals who come to be seen and to see what Thailand has to offer.[citation needed] Paragon remains among the most popular shopping ground for the small number of Thai elite, without excluding everyday commonplace and popular Thai items.

Siam Paragon is on Rama I Road in Pathum Wan district, and is adjacent to other shopping areas. It is next door to Siam Center and Siam Discovery Center and opposite Siam Square. MBK Center is also nearby. An elevated walkway beneath the BTS Skytrain tracks links Siam Paragon to the Ratchaprasong intersection, where CentralWorld, Gaysorn and several other shopping malls and hotels are located.

BTS Skytrain Sukhumvit and Silom Lines – Siam station has a skybridge linked to Siam Paragon's M floor.

Parking – 100,000 square meters, accommodating 4,000 cars.

9. Vimanmek Mansion:

The Vimanmek Mansion is a former royal palace in Bangkok, Thailand. It is also known as Vimanmek Palace. It is in the Dusit Palace complex, near Dusit Zoo in Dusit District.

Vimanmek Palace was constructed in 1900 by having the Munthatu Rattanaroj Residence in Chuthathuj Rachathan at Ko Sichang, Chonburi, dismantled and reassembled in Dusit Garden as the first permanent residence in the garden. Nails were used during in its construction. The interior decoration combines European neo-classical style with traditional Thai motifs and architecture and early-20th century modernization.

10. Bangkok National Museum:

The Bangkok National Museum is the main branch museum of the National Museums in Thailand and also the largest museum in Southeast Asia. It features exhibits of Thai art and history. The museum is located in 4 Na Phra That, Bangkok 10200, Thailand, occupying the former palace of the vice king (or Front Palace), set between Thammasat University, and the National Theater, facing Sanam Luang.

Other than preserving and displaying Thai artifacts dated from Dvaravati, Srivijaya, to Sukhothai and Ayutthaya period, the museum also displaying extensive collections of regional Asian Buddhist Arts such as Indian Gandhara, Chinese Tang, Vietnamese Cham, Indonesian Java, and Cambodian Khmer arts.

The Bangkok National Museum is generally open from Wednesday to Sunday from 9:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. except on national holidays.

The National Museum Volunteers offer foreign language tours of the museum. All tour begins at 9:30 a.m. In English and French are scheduled on Wednesdays and Thursdays, in Japanese on Wednesdays only, and in German on Thursdays only. All scheduled guided tours are free, but the museum entrance fee for non-Thai people is 200 Baht (6.02 USD).

11. Erawan Shrine:

The Erawan Shrine, formally the Thao Maha Phrom Shrine ("Shrine of Lord Brahma the Great"), is a Hindu shrine in Bangkok, Thailand, that houses a statue of Phra Phrom, the Thai representation of the Hindu god of creation Lord Brahma. A popular worship attraction, it often features performances by resident Thai dance troupes, who are hired by worshippers in return for seeing their prayers at the shrine answered.

The shrine is located by the Grand Hyatt Erawan Hotel, at the Ratchaprasong intersection of Ratchadamri Road in Pathum Wan district. It is near the Bangkok Skytrain's Chitlom Station, which has an elevated walkway overlooking the shrine. The area has many shopping malls nearby, including Gaysorn, CentralWorld and Amarin Plaza.

12. MBK Center:

MBK Center, also known as Mahboonkrong, is a large shopping mall in Bangkok, Thailand. At eight stories high, the center contains around 2,000 shops, restaurants and service outlets, including the 4-story Tokyu department store.

The MBK Center is popular with tourists, although the majority of shoppers are Bangkok residents. Many stores selling authentic merchandise are also available. MBK Center is connected to the Siam Discovery and Siam Paragon shopping mall by elevated walkways, both of which are more upscale and have only authentic goods.

MBK Center is located in Pathum Wan district, on the southwest corner of the intersection of Rama I Road and Phaya Thai Road. It is close to Siam Square, which can be reached from the second floor via a covered pedestrian bridge over Phaya Thai Road, and Siam Center and Siam Paragon, which are across Rama I Road from Siam Square.

13. CentralWorld:

CentralWorld is a shopping plaza and complex in Bangkok, Thailand. It is the sixth largest shopping complex in the world. The complex, which includes a hotel and office tower. In 2006, after three years of design and renovation, CentralWorld was expanded to 550,000 square meters of shopping mall and 1,024,000 square meters of complex, topping nearby rival Siam Paragon in terms of size.

Nearby Shopping Centers and Attractions include Gaysorn, BigC Ratchadamri, the Erawan Shrine, Amarin Plaza, Central Chidlom, Siam Paragon, Siam Center, Siam Discovery Center, Siam Square, MBK Center, Platinum Fashion Mall, Pantip Plaza, Chamchuri Square, Chulalongkorn University, the Royal Police Headquarter, and Wat Pathum Wanaram.

CentralWorld is located between Chit Lom and Siam Stations. An elevated walkway connects the two stations to facilitate foot traffic. CentralWorld can also be accessed from Gaysorn or BigC Ratchaprasong via pedestrian overpasses.

14. Wat Saket:

Wat Saket Ratcha Wora Maha Wihan (Wat Saket) is a Buddhist temple (wat) in Pom Prap Sattru Phai district, Bangkok, Thailand.

The temple dates back to the Ayutthaya era, when it was known as Wat Sakae. When Bangkok became the capital, King Rama I renovated the temple and gave it its present name.

Phu Khao Thong (Golden Mountain) is a steep artificial hill inside the Wat Saket compound.

Phu Khao Thong is now a popular Bangkok tourist attraction and has become one of the symbols of the city.

15. Dusit Zoo:

Dusit Zoo at Khao Din Park is a city zoo in Bangkok, Thailand. Located at Khao Din Park in Bangkok's Dusit District next to the Parliament House and Dusit Palace, it is the oldest zoo of Thailand.

Dusit Zoo is located in the heart of Bangkok, with over 1600 species of domestic and international animals, including:

* 331 mammals

* 170 reptiles

* 849 birds

Dusit Zoo is home to a wide variety of exotic animals, ranging from monkeys, alligators, kangaroos, and zebras, to penguins, elephants, camels, and giraffes. The Albino barking deer and white Bengal tiger are also rare highlights at the zoo. Play Land offers many rides and amusement facilities to entertain children throughout the day, while boat peddling and the sightseeing train provide different modes of exploration. Dusit Zoo also contains an animal hospital, zoo museum, and educational center.

Dusit Zoo operates from 8am to 6pm.

16. Wat Suthat:

Wat Suthat Thep Wararam is a Buddhist temple in Bangkok, Thailand. It is a royal temple of the first grade, one of ten such temples in Bangkok (23 in Thailand).

This temple contains the Buddha image Phra Sri Sakyamuni which has been moved from Sukhothai province. At the lower terrace of the base, there are 28 Chinese pagodas which mean the 28 Buddhas born on this earth. Wat Suthat also contains Phra Buddha Trilokachet in the Ubosot (Ordinary Hall) and Phra Buddha Setthamuni in the Sala Kan Parian (Meeting Hall).

The Giant Swing is a religious structure in Phra Nakhon, Bangkok, Thailand. Located in front of Wat Suthat, it was formerly used in an old Brahmin ceremony, and is one of Bangkok's tourist attractions.

17. Ananta Samakhom Throne Hall:

The Ananta Samakhom Throne Hall is a royal reception hall within Dusit Palace in Bangkok, Thailand. It was commissioned by King Chulalongkorn (Rama V) in 1908. The building was completed in 1915, 5 years after Rama V's death in 1910. It now serves as a museum and is from time to time employed for certain state occasions.

The hall is open to the public every day except on Chulalongkorn Day (23 October), the King's birthday (5 December) and the Queen's birthday (12 August).

The Throne Hall is a two story construction with a large dome (49.5 m high) in the center, surrounded by six smaller domes. The domes and walls are covered with paintings by Professor Galileo Chini and Carlo Riguli depicting the history of the Chakri Dynasty, from the first to the sixth reign.

In front of the Hall is the Royal Plaza with the equestrian statue of King Chulalongkorn (Rama V).

As the Throne Hall is a royal premise, visitors to the Throne Hall should be aware that an appropriate dress is required for entry; this means sleeved shirts (including short-sleeved ones) and trousers for men or long skirts for women. Shorts, ripped jeans, short skirts and sleeveless shirts are prohibited. Women in long trousers are not considered suitable. If needed, appropriate attire (a sarong) can be purchased there. All cameras and mobile phones must be kept in provided lockers at no cost. There is an entry fee for the Throne Hall, even if you have already paid to enter the Dusit Gardens. A recorded guide is available in several languages.

18. National Museum of Royal Barges:

The National Museum of Royal Barges is a museum in Bangkok, Thailand. It is on the northern rim of Bangkok Noi canal in the Bangkok Noi District.

The museum was formerly a dry dock for barges and warships under the care of the Royal Household and the Royal Navy. The dock and barges sustained severe bombing damage during World War II, but in 1949 they were restored by the Fine Arts Department as part of the Thai cultural heritage. Repairs were completed and the dock became the National Museum of Royal Barges in 1972.

19. Wat Benchamabophit:

Wat Benchamabophit Dusitvanaram is a Buddhist temple (wat) in the Dusit district of Bangkok, Thailand. Also known as the marble temple, it is one of Bangkok's most beautiful temples and a major tourist attraction. It typifies Bangkok's ornate style of high gables, stepped-out roofs and elaborate finials.

Inside the ordination hall (ubosot) is a Sukhothai-style Buddha statue named Phra Buddhajinaraja, cast in 1920 after the original located in Wat Mahathat in Phitsanulok. The main Buddha image is a copy of Phra Buddha Chinarat that resides in Phitsanulok in northern Thailand. The ashes of King Chulalongkorn are buried beneath the statue. In the gallery surrounding the ordination hall are 52 Buddha statues each showing different mudras (signs), collected by Prince Damrong Rajanubhab for his king. The temple was featured in the famous The Amazing Race 9 as the 10th and final elimination pit-stop. The image of the temple's façade is visible on the reverse side of the Five-Baht coin of the Thai currency. The site contains the Benchamabophit National Museum.

20. Dusit Palace:

Dusit Palace is a compound of royal residences in Bangkok, Thailand. Constructed over a large area north of Rattanakosin Island between 1897 and 1901 by King Chulalongkorn (Rama V). The palace, originally called Wang Suan Dusit or Dusit Garden Palace, eventually became the primary (but not official) place of residence of the King of Thailand, including King Rama V, King Vajiravudh (Rama VI), King Prajadhipok (Rama VII) and the present monarch King Bhumibol Adulyadej (Rama IX). The palace covers an area of over 64,749 square meters (696,950 sq. ft.) and is dotted between gardens and lawns with 13 different royal residences. Dusit Palace is surrounded by Ratchwithi Road in the north, Sri Ayutthaya Road in the south, Rachasima Road in the west and U-Thong Nai Road on the east.

Similar to all Thai royal palaces of the past Dusit Palace is divided into three areas, the outer, middle and inner courts. However unlike the Grand Palace, Dusit Palaces' courts were organized differently and were separated by canals and gardens as opposed to walls.

21. Bangkok Art and Culture Centre:

Bangkok Art and Culture Centre is a contemporary arts center in Bangkok, Thailand. Art, music, theatre, film, design and cultural/educational events take place in its exhibition and performance spaces. The Centre includes cafes, commercial art galleries, bookshops, craft shops and an art library. It is intended as a venue for cultural exchange in terms of content, curatorial and cultural management, giving Bangkok an operational base on the international art scene.

The bacc aims to create a meeting place for artists, to provide cultural programs for the community giving importance to cultural continuity from past to contemporary. It aims to open new grounds for cultural dialogue, networking, and create new cultural resources from both the public and the private sectors.

22. Siam Park City:

Siam Park City is an amusement and water park in the Khan Na Yao district of Bangkok, Thailand.

Inside Siam Park City

* Water park, there are artificial sea, big slider, spa and water fall.

* Amusement park, there is plaything about 30 type.

* Museum, containing a Dianotopia, an animal park and a safari section.

* Event zone for support each event.

* Camp for children.

Working hours: Water Park 10:00 – 17:00 every day, Amusement Park 11:00 – 18:00 every day.

23. Queen Saovabha Memorial Institute:

Queen Saovabha Memorial Institute (QSMI) in Bangkok, Thailand, is a famous institute that specializes in the husbandry of venomous snakes, the extraction and research of snake venom and vaccination especially rabies vaccine. It also houses the snake farm, a popular tourist attraction.

Containing thousands of some of the most venomous snakes in the world, such as the king cobra and all sorts of vipers, the snake farm is a highlight for any tourist visit. There are daily shows where handlers play around with pythons, and extractions of venom can also be witnessed. There is also a museum, and lectures are given.

The QSMI and the snake farm are located near Chulalongkorn Hospital, on the corner of Henri Dunant Road and Rama IV Road.

24. Suan Pakkad Palace:

Suan Pakkad Palace or Suan Pakkard Palace is a museum in Bangkok, Thailand. It is located on Sri Ayutthaya Road, south of the Victory Monument. The museum has Thai antiques on display, including Ban Chiang pottery over 4,000 years old. Originally the home of Prince Chumbhotpong Paripatra and his wife, they converted it into a museum which opened in 1952. The museum features a group of four traditional Thai houses with covered hallways between them. There is also artwork on display in its Marsi Gallery.

The name Suan Pakkad translates as "Cabbage Patch", but the museum's collection of five traditional pavilions is one of the best examples of traditional domestic architecture in the city. The Lacquer Pavilion is the most striking building, and is over 450 years old.

25. Democracy Monument:

The Democracy Monument is a public monument in the centre of Bangkok, capital of Thailand. It occupies a traffic circle on the wide east-west Ratchadamnoen Klang Road, at the intersection of Dinso Road. The monument is roughly halfway between Sanam Luang, the former royal cremation ground in front of Wat Phra Kaew, and the temple of the Golden Mount (Phu Kao Thong).

The monument was designed by Maeo Aphaiyawong, an architect whose brother, Khuang Aphaiyawong, was a leading member of Phibun's government. The Italian sculptor Corrado Feroci, who became a Thai citizen and used the Thai name Silpa Bhirasi from the Second World War on, initially to avoid Japanese military ire, executed the relief sculptures around the base of the monument. He also provided the main sculpting for the renowned Lady Mo monument in the northeast Thailand city of Nakhon Ratchasima.

26. Wat Ratchanatdaram:

Wat Ratchanatdaram is a Buddhist temple (wat) located at the intersection between Ratchadamnoen Klang and Maha Chai Road, in Phra Nakhon district, Bangkok. Meaning Temple of the Royal Niece, the temple was built to the order of King Nangklao (Rama III) for the princess granddaughter, Somanass Waddhanawathy in 1846.

The temple is best known for the Loha Prasat, a multi-tiered structure 36 m high and having 37 metal spires, signifying the 37 virtues toward enlightenment. It is the third Loha Prasada (brazen palace) in existence, modelled after the earlier ones in India and Anuradhapura, Sri Lanka. In the past, Loha Prasat was hidden behind an old movie theatre named Chaloem Thai. The theatre was demolished in 1989 as a project to improve scenery along Ratchadamnoen Road.

In 2005, the temple was submitted to UNESCO for consideration as a future World Heritage Site.

27. Siriraj Medical Museum:

The Siriraj Medical Museum, nicknamed the Museum of Death, is a medical museum in Bangkok, Thailand. Siriraj Medical Museum is open to the public and is a valuable resource for medical professionals and students. This museum consists of five small medical museums: the Ellis the Pathological Museum, Congdon Anatomical Museum, Sood Sangvichien Prehistoric Museum and Laboratory, Parasitology Museum, and the Songkran Niyomsane Forensic Medicine Museum.

The museum's opening hours are 10:00–17:00 Wednesday to Monday (closed Tuesdays and public holidays). Admission is 200 baht per person for non-Thai nationals, which grants access to the six constituent museums. A combined ticket of 300 baht grants access also to the Siriraj Bimuksthan Museum (located at the Old Bangkok Noi Railway Station).

28. Bangkok Corrections Museum:

The Bangkok Corrections Museum is an incarceration museum in Bangkok, Thailand. It is located on Maha Chai Road on the site of a former Bangkok maximum security prison built in 1890, during the reign of King Chulalongkorn Rama V. It was planned to follow the Brixton Prison of England. The prison museum was established in 1939 in another prison, the Bang Kwang Central Prison, which had served as a training center for corrections officers and gained the notorious title "Bangkok Hilton" in the way that the Hanoi Hilton did in Vietnam for its brutal prison history.

The museum records the macabre history and prison life in Thailand. However, although the Thai government decided to demolish much of the prison in 1987, three blocks, a cellblock, part of the prison wall and two watchtowers were preserved to establish the new Bangkok Corrections Museum. Later the remainder of the site became the Romanni Nart Park.

29. Baiyoke Tower II:

Baiyoke Tower II is an 85-storey, 304 m (997 ft.) skyscraper hotel at 222 Ratchaprarop Road in the Ratchathewi district of Bangkok, Thailand. It is the tallest building in the city, and comprises the Baiyoke Sky Hotel, the tallest hotel in Southeast Asia and the seventh-tallest all-hotel structure in the world.

With the antenna included, the building's height is 328.4 m (1,077 ft.), and features a public observatory on the 77th floor; a bar called "Roof Top Bar & Music Lounge" on the 83rd floor, a 360-degree revolving roof deck on the 84th floor and the hotel offers 673 guest rooms. Construction on the building ended in 1997, with the antenna being added two years later. The Baiyoke Sky Hotel website notes the height without the antenna as 309 m (1,014 ft.), but the Council on Tall Buildings and Urban Habitat (CTBUH), Emporis and SkyscraperPage note it as 304 m (997 ft.).

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