1. Ubud Monkey Forest:

The Ubud Monkey Forest is a nature reserve and Hindu temple complex in Ubud, Bali, Indonesia. Its official name is the Sacred Monkey Forest Sanctuary (Balinese Mandala Suci Wenara Wana), and its name as written on its welcome sign is the Padangtegal Mandala Wisata Wanara Wana Sacred Monkey Forest Sanctuary. The Ubud Monkey Forest is a popular tourist attraction and is often visited by over 10,000 tourists a month.

The Monkey Forest lies within the village of Padangtegal, which owns it. The village's residents view the Monkey Forest as an important spiritual, economic, educational, and conservation center for the village.

In 2011, approximately 605 crab-eating macaques (Macaca fascicularis) – 39 adult males, 38 male sub-adults, 194 adult females, 243 juveniles, and 91 infants – lived in the Ubud Monkey Forest; they are known locally as the Balinese long-tailed monkey.

The Ubud Monkey Forest contains a fenced enclosure for a small herd of Timor rusa (Rusa timorensis timorensis), a type of deer native to the island of Timor. Visitors may view the deer enclosure.

2. Seminyak:

Seminyak is a mixed tourist / residential area on the west coast of Bali just north of Kuta and Legian. Originally a separate township, this is now just another suburb of Kuta. This area is very popular with resident expatriates and land and accommodation prices are amongst the highest in Bali. Plenty of luxury spas and hotels abound. Owing to its high density of high-end shopping, combined with the clustering of many fine eating establishments, it has rapidly become one of the most well-known tourist areas on the island.

In addition to a few commercial strips with popular and lively restaurants, bars, villas, and good crafts/furniture shops, there are a few notable establishments: Ku Dé Ta, which is a bar/restaurant with a cult following based on its beach side/semi-resort atmosphere that has earned it the title of number one party spot in various magazines, and Oberoi, which is an expensive hotel with a worldwide reputation. La Lucciola is a restaurant located in the north of Seminyak on the beach and has been in existence for over a decade.

3. Sanur, Bali:

Sanur is a coastal stretch of beach of Denpasar city of southeast Bali, about 30 minutes’ drive from Ngurah Rai International Airport, which has grown into a little town in its own right. A 5.1 kilometers of the Sanur's coastline from Matahari Terbit Beach to Mertasari Beach has been ready reclaimed in 2008.

The northern part of Sanur beach was used as the landing site for the Dutch invasion troops during the Dutch intervention in Bali (1906). During World War II, Sanur was again the entry point through which the Japanese forces landed to occupy the island of Bali.

Today Sanur contains a number of hotel resorts such as the Fairmont Sanur Beach Bali and Bali Hyatt (currently under renovation and not to be confused with the Grand Hyatt in Nusa Dua). Sanur is also home to a growing number of popular villa resorts, such as The Zen Villas.

Traditional fishing boats can be seen on the beach of Sanur offering a scenic view of the island Nusa Penida.

Another interesting sight can be visited in the south of Sanur in Jalan Danau Poso Street beside Pura Belangjong, a small Hindu temple. A stone column measuring 1.77 metres can be seen under a roof at the end of a small and short blind alley. This is the oldest object produced by men on Bali. The column bears inscriptions dating from the 9th century written in Sanskrit and in a very old form of Balinese. Various objects made of stone possibly dating from the same period are exhibited as well.

4. Tanah Lot:

Tanah Lot is a rock formation off the Indonesian island of Bali. It is home to the pilgrimage temple Pura Tanah Lot (literally "Tanah Lot temple"), a popular tourist and cultural icon for photography and general exoticism. Tanah Lot means "Land [sic: in the] Sea" in the Balinese language. Located in Tabanan, about 20 kilometers (12 mi) from Denpasar, the temple sits on a large offshore rock which has been shaped continuously over the years by the ocean tide.

The area leading to Tanah Lot is highly commercialized and people are required to pay to enter the area. To reach the temple, visitors must walk through a set of Balinese market-format souvenir shops which cover each side of the path down to the sea. On the mainland clifftops, restaurants have also been provided for tourists.

5. Uluwatu Temple:

Uluwatu Temple is a Balinese sea temple (pura segara) in Uluwatu (Kuta South, Badung). The temple is regarded as one of the sad kahyangan and is dedicated to Sang Hyang Widhi Wasa in his manifestation as Rudra.

The temple (pura in Balinese) is built at the edge (ulu) of a 70 meter high cliff or rock (watu) projecting into the sea.[unreliable source] In folklore, this rock is said to be part of Dewi Danu's petrified barque.

The temple is inhabited by monkeys, who are notorious for snatching visitors' belongings. They can usually be persuaded into trading the items for fruit, although this only encourages them to steal more.

6. Legian:

Legian is a suburban and beach area on the west coast of Bali just north of Kuta and south of Seminyak the area between Jl. Melasti and Jl. Dhyana Pura. Administratively it is a subdistrict of Kuta District of Badung Regency.

7. Agung Rai Museum of Art:

The Agung Rai Museum of Art is a museum located in Ubud on Bali, Indonesia.

ARMA features an internationally appreciated collection of traditional Balinese paintings as well as modern Indonesian and foreign paintings. It bears the soul of its founder Agung Rai and shows a deep love for the Balinese culture.

8. Bali Safari and Marine Park:

Bali Safari and Marine Park, or Taman Safari III is a branch of Taman Safari located in Gianyar, Bali.

Tickets can be purchased through the official BSMP ticketing partner Voyagin.

Ganesha Park is a park which has a 9-metre (30 ft) statue of Ganesha. This will be the entrance to the Bali Theatre, which will feature Balinese Art.[3] Foreign tourist can enjoy elephants bathing on this place.

Pura Safari is a temple (pura) located in the zoo, where people of Hindu Dharma and Hindu religious worship.

9. Garuda Wisnu Kencana:

Mandala Garuda Wisnu Kencana, or Garuda Wisnu Kencana (GWK), is a cultural park covering approximation 60 ha area located in Ungasan, Badung Regency, or about 10–15 minutes driving from Bali Ngurah Rai International Airport. It is devoted to the Hindu God Vishnu, and his mount, Garuda, the mythical bird who becomes his companion.

Currently, the statue of Vishnu is 23 meters (75.5 ft.) high, although the original plan was for a 120-metre (390 ft.) gold-plated Vishnu riding Garuda on top of an 11-storey entertainment complex. Garuda wing span will be 64 meters (210.0 ft.) across. The idea was not without controversy, and religious authorities on the island complained that its massive size might disrupt the spiritual balance of the island, and that its commercial nature was inappropriate, but some groups agree with the project, because it will make new tourist attraction over barren land.

 

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